Graduate Courses

CHIST 514. Church History I: Early Christians to the Middle Ages

3 credit course

This course replaces Church History, Part I  CHIST 562, 206-0501.

Church History I: Early Christians to the Middle Ages is the first of two graduate survey courses covering the whole of Catholic history. This first course examines the central themes and events in the life of the Church from the days of the Apostles to the end of the Middle Ages using text resources. Students will study the great events of the Church’s past, the development of Christian thought and belief, and the immense contributions of popes, saints, theologians, and common Christians to the progress of the Faith through the ages. Those who complete this course should be able to describe the key issues and topics related to the development of the Christian Church from the time of Christ to the end of the Middle Ages; explain the patterns of Church life from Pentecost to the start of the Renaissance and have a familiarity with the most important leaders, events, and writings; and build on the course foundation to delve deeper into Church history and to pursue other courses on specific topics related to the broader tapestry of Early and Medieval Christianity.

This course includes written lectures and online discussion.

CHIST 524. Church History II: Renaissance to Modern Church

3 credit course

This course replaces Church History, Part I CHIST 563, 206-0502.

Church History II:  Renaissance to Modern Church is the second of two graduate survey courses covering the whole of Catholic history. The first course examined the central themes in the life of the Church from the days of the Apostles to the end of the Middle Ages. In this course, students will study the great events of Church history from the Renaissance, through the Protestant and Catholic Reformations and the Enlightenment and era of revolutions, to the tumultuous 20th century. We will meet extraordinary saints, popes, theologians, artists, and writers who have all helped to guide the progress of the Church across the globe.

This course includes written lectures and online discussion.

CHIST 544. History of the Catholic Church in America

3 credit course

This course addresses the history of the Catholic Church in North America from the arrival of Christopher Columbus in 1492 to the present time. Students will be presented with a survey of the foundations of the Catholic faith in North America, the progress of the Faith in the 19th century, including the era of immigration, urbanization, and the Civil War, and the life of Catholicism in the modern era. Focus will also include the work of the Baltimore councils, the activities of the Church during the Great Depression and the two World Wars, the election of John F. Kennedy, the impact of the Second Vatican Council (1962-65), and possible keys areas of concern for the Church in the 21st century and beyond.

 

This course includes written lectures, audio lectures, and online discussion.

GREEK 501. Biblical Greek I

3 credit course

Old course number 206-1803

This course is an introduction to the Greek language as it appears in the texts of both the Old and New Testaments. While emphasis will be on the basic morphology of nouns and verbs and most frequently used words in Biblical Greek, the students will also learn all the basic pronouns and prepositions, the three noun declensions, all the tenses in which finite Greek verbs appear, many of the basic rules of Greek syntax, and, finally, the commonly used Greek participle.

This course includes written lectures, audio pronunciation lessons, and online discussions.

Please note: All students are required to download and install Greek fonts to allow for full participation in typing the Greek language in the online courseroom. Instructions will be provided (the downloaded file is "zipped" and will require unpacking with a compression utility such as WinZip or 7-Zip).

In addition, to play the audio files all students must have media player software such as RealPlayer, Windows Media Player, or QuickTime Player, or else have an MP3 player such as an iPod.

It is highly recommended that students have a high-speed Internet connection to allow for downloading the large audio files used in this course.


 

GREEK 502. Biblical Greek II

3 credit course

Old course number 206-1804

This course builds upon the foundation of Biblical Greek I.  Students will receive reinforcement of basic Greek grammar and morphology learned in the first course. The practice of hearing and reciting paradigms and principal parts will be continued throughout this course.

This course includes written lectures, audio pronunciation lessons, and online discussions.

Please note: All students are required to download and install Greek fonts to allow for full participation in typing the Greek language in the online courseroom. Instructions will be provided (the downloaded file is "zipped" and will require unpacking with a compression utility such as WinZip or 7-Zip).

In addition, to play the audio files all students must have media player software such as RealPlayer, Windows Media Player, or QuickTime Player, or else have an MP3 player such as an iPod.

It is highly recommended that students have a high-speed Internet connection to allow for downloading the large audio files used in this course.

LATIN 501. Latin I

3 credit course

Old course number 216-1801

The first eight lessons of this course consist of a lecture, vocabulary, and assigned exercises from the textbook. Besides these requirements, the student is expected to memorize each paradigm as they are encountered. As new concepts are encountered, the lecture will provide detail not given in the textbook, as well as each concept’s application to both English and Latin.

The vocabulary is drawn from traditional liturgical books, i.e., the Missale Romanum and the Breviarium Romanum.  Rather than primarily preparing the student to read Julius Caesar’s Gallic Wars, as the traditional Latin curriculum dictates, the course instead is geared towards reading knowledge of the Vulgate Bible, the Missal and the Breviary.  Though the vocabulary acquired is derived largely from the preconciliar liturgical books, it will be equally applicable to both the Extraordinary and Ordinary Forms of the Roman Rite, as well as the other historical uses of the Latin Rite.  The grammatical instruction acquired in the course provides the foundation upon which further study of Latin, be it classical or ecclesiastical, liturgical or canonical, can build.

At completion of the course, the student will have studied:
•    The -io subgroup of the third conjugation of verbs
•    Deponent verbs
•    Relative, interrogative and indefinite pronouns
•    Additional verb forms and constructions
•    Comparison of adjectives and adverbs
•    Additional irregular verbs
•    Questions
•    Additional uses of the nominal cases

This course includes written lectures, audio pronunciation lessons, and online discussions.




LATIN 502. Latin II

3 credit course

Old course number 216-1802

The first eight lessons of this course consist of a lecture, vocabulary, and assigned exercises from the textbook. Besides these requirements, the student is expected to memorize each paradigm as they are encountered. As new concepts are encountered, the lecture will provide detail not given in the textbook, as well as each concept’s application to both English and Latin.

This course includes written lectures, audio pronunciation lessons, and online discussions.



PHIL 508. Philosophy for Theology

3 credit course

request information

Old course number 206-1207

This philosophy course must be taken by all students in the MA program. It includes three major segments on Augustine and the Platonic Tradition: an overview of the thought of St. Augustine, its debt to ancient and Neo-Platonism, and its importance during the first millennium of Western Christianity.

This course includes written lectures and online discussion.

PHIL 534. Philosophy of the Human Person

3 credit course

Old course number 206-2207

This course is a philosophical exploration of humanity.  Through probing the thought of Socrates, Aristotle, St. Thomas, John Paul II, and Benedict XVI, two fundamental questions will be addressed:  what is human nature, and what does it mean to be a person?  Further, several contemporary challenges to the perennial Catholic thought on human nature and personhood will be considered.

Students who complete this course should be able to demonstrate a clear understanding of human nature and its primary faculties; to describe the philosophical notion of personhood as applied to the human condition; to define the fundamentally ethical orientation of  humanity; to explain how humanity is considered within the Catholic intellectual tradition; and to critique several modern ideologies by showing how they fundamentally differ from the perennial philosophical understanding of humanity embraced by the Catholic tradition.

This course includes written lectures and online discussion.






PHIL 648. Phenomenology: Truth of the World

3 credit course

Old course number 206-1201

Prerequisite for this course:  PHIL 508 Philosophy for Theology or the three-part Philosophy for Theology one credit series: PHIL 505, PHIL 506, PHIL 507.

The Truth of the World will offer an introduction to phenomenology which is a philosophy that interprets reality according to certain presuppositions and establishes certain principles about objective reality and the knowing subject. This course will focus on phenomenology from the point of view of the Swiss theologian Hans Urs von Balthasar. The main reason for spending time on this philosophy from his perspective is that, in it, he has explained some features of Thomas Aquinas’ De Veritate (On Truth). Secondly, the methods of phenomenology underlie much of the work of Pope John Paul II, so this course will be helpful in that regard as well, even though John Paul II works more from the insights of Max Scheler.

This course includes narrated power point presentation, audio transcriptions, and online discussions.

 

RELED 550. Principles for Ecclesial Service

3 credit course

Old course number 206-2601

This survey course will examine those documents from Vatican II to our present day that present principles and guidelines of both a practical and theological nature for lay individuals serving in a ministerial capacity within the Catholic Church.  The study of these principles will be applied to ministry activity of all kinds (i.e. music, catechesis, home visitation, etc.) carried out in either a paid or volunteer basis.  Students who have successfully completed this course should have accurate knowledge of the principles that the Church has established for all types of ecclesial service, have an appreciation for the historical development of lay ministry, and apply Church directives to current and future issues that affect the work of the laity serving the Church.

This course includes written lectures and online discussion.



RELED 560. Principles of Catholic Education

3 credit course

Principles of Catholic Education is a graduate-level course that will examine the theoretical framework and the pastoral foundations of catechetical ministry, particularly the work of learning and teaching in Catholic parishes and schools. It utilizes primary sources, a history of catechesis in the United States, and contemporary resources to identify principles of education that reflect the divine pedagogy and the development of a clear Catholic Identity. Students who complete this course should be able to analyze contextual factors influencing teaching and learning, evaluate educational resources, and design educational strategies appropriate for authentic human formation and catechesis for a lifelong relationship with Jesus Christ.

This course includes written lectures, audio and video presentations, and asynchronous online shared learning activities

RELED 671. Leadership for Catholic Adult Faith Formation

3 credit course

Old course number 206-0902

Leadership for Catholic Adult Faith Formation is a graduate level course that will examine the foundations of leadership for adult faith formation that emerge from Scripture and Tradition and the Magisterium of the Church.  The course will explore models of leadership that lead to personal conversion and public witness; study special questions about spirituality for the leader as well as for the student; and address current religious and moral questions that programs should incorporate.  This course will use primary sources from the Vatican and the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, but will also include the use of theological and spiritual resources that can be used by the leader within the adult faith formation setting.  Students who complete this course should be able to connect the knowledge and skills they have gained in previous theology courses with the principles and methods needed for the practice of leadership in adult faith formation for parish or other Church settings.

This course includes written lectures, audio lectures, and online discussions.

 

 


SCRPT 515. Biblical Foundations

3 credit course

Old course number 206-0402

This course is an introduction to the academic study of the Bible.  After being grounded in modern Church teachings about the nature of divine revelation, its relationship to tradition, and guidelines for interpretation, students will study Biblical interpretation in the Church and in the world, as it has evolved down through the ages.  The class will start with the Church fathers and the medieval scholastics and discuss what can be learned in their experiences in wrestling with the Biblical text.  Then students will consider how the post-Enlightenment discussion of the Bible evolved, how modern critical methods arose, what questions these methods were intended to answer, and the extent to which they succeeded and failed.  Finally, the class will discuss ways that Catholics can learn from and build upon what has been done in the past to advance the goals of Biblical interpretation in the Church.

This course includes written lectures and online discussion. This course is a 16 week course.



SCRPT 520. Pentateuch

3 credit course

This course will approach the first five books of the Bible, known as the Pentateuch from the perspective of the ancient Hebrews.  Students will learn to appreciate the imagery that the Hebrews used from creation and the material world to describe spiritual experience and supernatural realities.  Specifically, students will gain understanding of two currents of thought that bring unity to the first five books of the Bible as well as the entire Bible.  The first will be creation theology where the idea of sacred space is prominent with the imagery of creation as temple, and the second is that of covenant.  

This course includes written lectures, audio lectures, and online discussions.

SCRPT 530. Introduction to Scripture and Salvation History

3 credit course

This 8-week multimedia course will be a journey through the Bible as the Catholic Church’s foundational narrative, beginning with the story of creation and the fall, through God’s promise to Abraham, the covenant with Israel at Sinai and Deuteronomy and the eventual collapse of the Davidic Kingdom under the Deuteronomic covenant.  The course will climax with the solution to the problems of the law in the Old Testament and the eventual fulfillment of God’s promises through the person and work of Jesus Christ and his Church.  Students will be introduced to critical interpretive issues and will be invited to wrestle with disputed questions as they learn various ways of making sense of the Bible as a unified and coherent story with profound implications for today.

SCRPT 540. Isaiah and the Prophets

3 credit course

Old course number 206-0430

This course provides an introduction to the Old Testament prophets with a special focus on the prophecy of Isaiah.  It will begin with a brief study of Church teachings about reading the Bible generally, the Old Testament specifically, and the necessary beginning of all Catholic Biblical interpretation with the historical dimension of the inspired text.  Thus, students will become thoroughly grounded in the rise, division, decline, narrow survival, eventual destruction, and God’s promised restoration of the Davidic monarchy as well as the inextricable relationship between history and Biblical prophecy.  
The beginning period of the course will also include an introduction to reading Hebrew poetry in translation and the importance of literary genre in Biblical interpretation.   In the second part of the course, the actual text of Isaiah will be studied.  Since the book of Isaiah’s historical span is awesome and its text has profound relationships to other Biblical prophets, students will work through the entire book while noting parallel ideas in other prophets as well.  Furthermore, because Isaiah’s prophetic words are rightly famous, students will also study the ways in which the book of Isaiah has profoundly influenced the New Testament as well as the later Church.  
Students who complete this course should be able to:
identify the salient points of the history of the Davidic monarchy from the time of David to the Babylonian exile and the relevance of history for understanding and interpreting the prophets;
explain the phenomenon of prophecy in Israel and what made this phenomenon unique in the ancient world;
understand the great challenges and great benefits that go with reading Israel’s prophets as Christian scripture;
identify the main characteristics of Hebrew poetry, its difference from prose and the importance of literary genre in Biblical interpretation;  
give an overview of the careers of Israel’s major prophets as well as selected members of the so-called minor prophets;
grasp the details of the life and times of Isaiah the prophet and their relationship to the book of Isaiah;
gain an appreciation of theological themes in the book of Isaiah and the influence of these themes on the expectations of the New Testament authors; and gain an appreciation of how the book of Isaiah has influenced the Church down through the centuries.

This course includes written lectures, audio and video supplements, and online discussion.

Please note: To play the video files all students must have media player software such as QuickTime Player, or else have an MP4 player such as an iPod.

It is highly recommended that students have a high-speed Internet connection to allow for downloading the large video files used in this course.


SCRPT 570. The Letter to the Romans

3 credit course

Romans is the Bible's most influential book in Church history but also the most controversial and difficult of St. Paul's letters. Many central Christian doctrines are found here such as original sin, grace, election and predestination. But above all, the letter is St. Paul's theological masterpiece, since he there explains how God, in the gospel of Jesus Christ, has been completely faithful to all of his promises to Israel given in the Old Testament. In this exciting eight week online course, we will approach Romans, therefore, as Paul's interpretation and exposition of the story of the Jewish Bible, a story that has reached its climax in Jesus and the restored people of God.

This course includes written lectures and online instruction.

SCRPT 571. The Gospel of St. John

3 credit course

Old course number 206-0451

This course on the Gospel of St. John is designed to help students gain a familiarity with the biblical text of the Fourth Gospel (in English). In particular, students will read and study the Gospel of St. John closely, examining its primary theological and literary characteristics.  Important secondary materials will guide our study.  In addition to employing the best of modern critical interpretation, the Gospel of St. John will be read here within the framework of the Church’s living Tradition.  Students who complete this course should be able to demonstrate a good understanding of the Fourth Gospel’s major theological themes, symbols, and literary techniques.

This course includes written lectures and online discussion.


 

SCRPT 576. The Letters of St. Paul

3 credit course

Old course number 206-0460

This course is an introduction to the letters of St. Paul the Apostle.  In some sense, the proper starting point is Paul himself. No figure in early Christianity, aside from Jesus himself, is as crucial to our understanding of the message of the Gospel – both then and now.  Though “Saul” was a fierce opponent of the Church, his encounter with the risen Christ profoundly changes his heart, his mind and the mission of his life.  As a man taken up “in Christ” he lived to boldly proclaim the mystery of the gospel” (Eph. 6:19). Following an introduction to Paul the Apostle, the emphasis turns to “major themes” in the Pauline epistles and then a discussion of each of the epistles themselves.  Throughout the course, students will read Paul’s letters and grapple with his theological vision.  Aside from Sacred Scripture, the primary textbook is What Saint Paul Really Said by Pauline scholar N.T. Wright.

This course includes written lectures, audio lectures, and online discussions.

SCRPT 662. The Synoptic Gospels

3 credit course

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Old course number 206-0452

The Synoptic Gospels course offers an in-depth study on the three gospels that present the life, Passion, death, and Resurrection of Jesus similarly -- Matthew, Mark, and Luke. The course also explores the differences in these three gospels.

This course includes written lectures, audio lectures, and online discussions.

SPIR 501. Applied Catholic Spirituality

3 credit course

request informationApplied Catholic Spirituality  introduces the student to the classical “three ways,”or  stages of the spiritual life, and the practical skills by which one may embark on the Catholic spiritual life.  Beginning with the teachings of Christ as recorded in the Gospels, this course also offers contemporary insight into the experience of personal conversion from the magisterial teaching of St John Paul II.  Following the framework of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, the lessons of this course offer a testimony to the rich variety of Christian practices, illustrated in the lives and teachings of the outstanding masters of the spiritual life. Students who complete this course should be able to describe the unique contributions of these masters and identify the common threads that constitute the authentic tradition of Catholic doctrine and life. 

THEO 503. The Catholic Theological Tradition

3 credit course

This course introduces the student to the history of Christian theology as fides quaerens intellectum ("faith seeking [deeper] understanding"). Our method will be to survey Christian theology as it developed historically from the end of the New Testament times to the Second Vatican Council. As we examine several of the key issues that were debated in each epoch, we shall meet some of history's most famous [and infamous!] theologians and come to understand their sometimes contradictory, sometimes complementary, ways of thinking about the things of God. Throughout our survey, special attention will be given to:

  • the development of a chronological framework which will give order and coherence to all the theological knowledge you acquire in the future.
  • the problem of "development of doctrine": how can we say that the faith of the Catholic Church today is the same as the faith of the New Testament Church if certain Catholic practices and beliefs seem not to be explicitly found in the Bible?
  • special critical moments in the history of theology, such as the period of the early Church Fathers, the Protestant and Catholic Reformation, and the theological revival leading up to the Second Vatican Council.

 

THEO 510. Revelation and Faith: Fundamental Theology

3 credit course

Old course number 206-0105

There are some foundational issues that are necessary for the study of systematic theology. The course begins by examining the nature and method of systematic theology and the sources of divine revelation. The topics covered in the course include God, his existence and attributes, the relation between faith and reason, biblical inspiration and interpretation, the development of Christian doctrine, and authority in the Church.

This course includes written lectures, audio lectures, and online discussions.

 


 

THEO 551. Theology of the Sacraments

3 credit course

request informationOld course number 206-0204

This course is designed to introduce the student to the study of the sacraments in the context of the worshipping Church. The course will begin by setting forth a notion of the worshipping community. This will form the basis of a systematic approach to understanding the sacraments and issues related to the study of the sacraments. There will also be an analysis of each of the sacraments and their significance for the life of the faith in the community. At the end of this course, the student should be able to describe fundamental issues related to the study of the sacraments, analyze key theological issues surrounding the sacraments, and articulate the relationship of the sacraments to Roman Catholic understanding of the faith. In addition, the student should be able to describe an integrative sacramental theory and an understanding of the significance of each sacrament as understood in the Roman Catholic tradition.

This course includes narrated power point presentation, audio transcriptions, and online discussions.






 

 

THEO 560. Fundamental Moral Theology

3 credit course

Old course number 206-0307

In this course moral theology comes alive and grows in the hearts and minds of people and transforms the way in which people make sense of life; the way using Jesus, crucified and risen, and his sense of life (the Beatitudes). With the help of readings by moral theologian Fr. Servais Pinckaers and others, students should be able to understand the foundations (the Triune God's creating, redeeming, and sanctifying activities) and components (conscience, character, and prudence) of moral theology and how they come together in a person's repentance and continuing conversion.

This course includes written lectures and online discussion.

THEO 584. The Modern Crisis of Values and the Catholic Mind

3 credit course

request informationOld course number 206-1206

This course revolves around two basic presuppositions: 1) Nihilism, a philosophical position asserting the negation of all value and meaning, is the pervading cultural ethos of the post-Christian modern world and how 2) Christianity in general, and Catholicism in particular, offer the only viable alternative to the nihilistic culture of death so present today. The current cultural crisis of nihilism is complicated and multi-faceted. For this reason, this course draws upon several disciplines, including philosophy, literature, and theology to analyze the roots and consequences of nihilism and the Catholic response to it.

The course will proceed in three general movements. First, students will study Friedrich Nietzsche, the famous German philosopher, to gain a clear understanding of what nihilism means as a philosophical position impacting culture. Selections from The Basic Writings of Nietzsche and Thus Spoke Zarathustra will be studied. Second, course participants will read several modern literary works that dramatically exemplify the horrific cultural consequences of nihilism, including Crime & Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky and several short works by the American Catholic writer Flannery O’Connor. Third, this course will focus on the Magisterium of the Church by reviewing key sections of the encyclicals Gaudium et Spes and Fides et Ratio to appreciate how the Church offers modern men and women a hopeful response to the spiritual disease of nihilism.

This course includes written lectures and online discussion.

 

 

THEO 598. Holy Land: The Fifth Gospel

3 credit course

There is no better place to study the four canonical gospels than in the place where the drama of salvation was acted out.  The holy places in the land where the Savior walked speak so powerfully of the work of redemption that the land is rightly called “the fifth gospel.”  The learning in this course will primarily take place not online, but on site for ten days in Jerusalem, Bethlehem, and Galilee.  Prior to and subsequent to the trip, there will be some fascinating reading and online discussion which will be the basis for a term paper to be submitted at the end of the class eight week period.  The primary goal of this interdisciplinary course will be to give the student insight into the Bible that can only be captured by being in the land.  Secondarily, we will learn about the Fathers of the Church, including Origen, Eusebius, Justin, Jerome, and Cyril of Jerusalem, who lived and wrote in the Holy Land.  Finally, since travel in the Holy Land will bring us face-to-face with the Crusades and Muslim-Christian relations, we will learn about Church history and inter-religious dialogue.  For graduate students, the course could be counted toward a concentration in Scripture, Theology/Philosophy, Ecclesial Service or Catholic Culture or toward the certificate program in Scripture or Church History, provided one completes a research assignment appropriate to one’s area of study.  Approval is required, contact the Registrar.

THEO 599. Italy: Crossroads of Christendom

3 credit course

While Christianity was born in the middle East, it was Italy that became, within a few decades after Christ’s resurrection, the Crossroads of the Christian world.  For two thousand years Christians from East and West, North and South, have come to Italy to serve Christ and his Church.  In this course, we’ll be examining the lives and work of many great Christians that spent part of their lives in central Italy.  The apostles Peter and Paul, the native Italians Sts. Benedict, Clare, and Francis, the Spaniard St. Ignatius of Loyola, the Greek missionaries Sts. Cyril and Methodius, the great artists Michelangelo and Raphael, all these and more will be the subject of our study.  Our learning will primarily take place not online, but on site for ten days in Rome, Assisi, Florence, and Orvieto.  Prior to the trip, there will be some fascinating reading and online discussion which will be the basis for a term paper to be submitted after the trip.  The goal of this interdisciplinary course will be to give the student an appreciation of the depth and breadth of the Catholic culture represented by the abundant monuments to faith to be found in central Italy. For graduate students, the course could be counted toward a concentration in Scripture, Theology/Philosophy, Ecclesial Service or Catholic Culture or toward the certificate program in Scripture or Church History, provided one completes a research assignment appropriate to one’s area of study.  Approval is required, contact the Registrar.

THEO 617. The Evidence for God from Contemporary Physics and Philosophy

3 credit course

Prepared by Fr. Spitzer S.J., this course is based on his new book New Proofs for the Existence of God, which examines scientific data in the light of philosophical analysis specifically into the nature of proof itself. This cutting edge course makes a strong argument for the plausibility of theism. Robert Jastrow, the former director of Goddard Institute of Space Studies, said: “[the scientist who has lived by his faith in the power of reason] has scaled the mountains of ignorance; he is about to conquer the highest peak; as he pulls himself over the final rock, he is greeted by a band of theologians who have been sitting there for centuries.” This analysis adds new meaning to life, to our understanding of transcendence and destiny. Come and join us in the journey.

This course contains video lectures with audio, written lecture materials, power points, and online discussion.


THEO 618. Introduction to St. Thomas Aquinas

3 credit course

This is a cross-listed undergraduate and graduate course that introduces students to the theology of Saint Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274). Pope John Paul II said that: “the Church has been justified in consistently proposing St. Thomas as a master of thought and a model of the right way to do theology." So it is very helpful for students who are studying theology to have tackled a tiny bit of his writings. The course will very gently take the student into a few of Thomas’ articles on the theology of God, Man and virtue, Jesus Christ and the Sacraments. To keep it simple, this course will not analyze the objections that he treats. Thomas has a great method for thinking theologically―so essential in today’s world. He begins with a concrete illustration of what he is dealing with and then draws a few principles from this example.

THEO 631. Introduction to Christology

3 credit course

Old course number 206-2301

This course provides an introduction to Catholic theology of Jesus Christ.  Upon completion of this course, you will have probed the biblical witness to the mystery of Jesus; read important selections from the history of Christology, including those from the great councils of the first centuries of the Church; and examined contemporary systematic questions.  Introduction to Christology will provide a catechetical overview of the Church’s teaching on Christ, as well as an opportunity to engage in mature theological inquiry concerning this great mystery of the Faith.

This course includes written lectures and online discussion.

THEO 640. Presenting the Faith in the Modern World: Dealing with Hard Questions

3 credit course

Presenting the Faith in the Modern World:  Dealing with the Hard Questions introduces the student to the more fraught and challenging applications of Catholic teaching to real life situations in contemporary Western society.  The course is designed to prepare students for real engagement with both contemporary secular and religious views at odds with Catholicism.  The course will equip those who hold teaching (or other public positions) with practical guidance on how to dialogue pastorally and constructively with persons who hold contrary viewpoints.

 

THEO 641. Theology of the Church

3 credit course

request information Old course number 206-1001

This course describes how the Church is part of God’s plan of salvation. The course analyzes the structure of the Church. This leads into a comprehension of the way that the Church is at the service of mankind. The last part of the course covers the way in which the Church is a pilgrim upon this earth gathering mankind in to the heavenly banquet in the New Jerusalem. The person who completes this course will better understand the Church and so will be able to see more clearly the role of the Church in their life, in the life of their family, and in society at large. 

This course includes narrated power point presentation, audio transcriptions, and online discussions.


Please note: Because this course uses audio and flash technology, it is highly recommended that students have a high-speed internet connection and a flash player such as Adobe Flash or the Safari flash plug-in (MAC). Most will find that they already have flash. Otherwise, it is freely available on the web at http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/. Download assistance is available.

Alternatively, a written transcription of each lesson is provided online in the course room.



THEO 682. Forming a Catholic World View: Catholic Social Teachings

This survey course will introduce the basic principles of Catholic Social Teaching, what has been called the Church’s “best kept secret.” This course will help students to identify and explain the seven themes of Catholic Social Teaching; trace the history of Catholic social thought especially the key Church documents and papal encyclicals from Pope Leo XIII’s Rerum Novarum in 1891 to Pope Francis’ Laudato Si’ in 2015; understand the theological foundations for Catholic Social Teaching in Scripture and Tradition; and develop an ability to apply these teachings to specific situations and issues, including immigration, war and peace, economics, and the dignity of the human person from conception to natural death.

THEO 697. Thesis Direction

0 credit course

Old course number 210-0000

A Master’s Thesis of approximately thirty pages is to be focused on the concentration and to be submitted after all course work is completed. Students must consult their program advisor to select a topic and will then have six months to finish. Thesis papers that go beyond that period will require re-enrollment and additional fees. To register for thesis direction, contact the graduate registrar.

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